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Equipment List

Everything you need for your trail running or hiking adventure.
Jump to hiking list

DISCLAIMER: These lists may shock you if you feel the sudden need to buy equipment which can become expensive fast. Before you get discouraged, ask us about the gear you have and we’ll let you know if it will work or not. Having the complete list would be an ideal set-up, but coming close will likely do the trick.

Trail Run Austria is not compensated for any advertisement in these lists.

Trail Running Equipment

Mountain Rescue Insurance: It is highly recommended to purchase mountain rescue insurance before your trip. In case of an emergency, Search and Rescue will come to your aid whether you are insured or not, but having it can save you significant sums of money in rescue fees. Alongside many other benefits like reduced prices at Austrian mountain huts, 62€/year for peace of mind in the mountains is a small price to pay. For more information visit the Austrian Alpine Club website.

Water: It is mandatory to have a carrying capacity of 1L of water on every trip. While Austria is full of fresh streams from glacial runoff and groundwater, we like to stay on the safe side and carry our drinking water. Don’t worry, we’ll be using that clean, refreshing water to cool down every chance we get!

Snacks: A trail runner’s best friend: M&M’s, gummies, nuts, fruit, etc. When you’re in need of a little boost, your favourite snack can give you energy and lift your spirits as well. Try to picture what you’re going to want to eat when your body is saying stop, and pack it in your shorts or vest. No steaks please!

Lunch: Some people go all day without eating anything but trail mix, but others need something more filling. To stay on the safe side and to avoid any rapid energy loss situations, we ask that you pack a lunch on day trips. Most Austrian bakeries have delicious sandwiches that make for a great mid-day booster.

Phone: Saving the local emergency numbers as well as Trail Run Austria’s office number can save valuable time in case of an emergency. Your phone should be fully charged and we recommend bringing a plastic bag for any electronics you bring in case of rain.

Shoes: Shoes are a runner’s most important piece of technical equipment. The Alps feature a large variety of terrain, so having shoes that are up to the task of keeping you safe, comfy, and agile in the mountains is very important. For a great guide to finding the right trail running shoe for you, check out this article by Salomon. Make sure to have ample foot support/protection, and most importantly, a good tread!

Poles: Running with poles may sound cumbersome and impractical, but many runners find doing so has far more benefits than fallbacks. It can reduce strain on the body, especially the knees, help with balance, and save a lot of energy on those big ascents as well as save steps on technical descents. For more on the pros and cons of running with poles, check out this article by CTS.

Running Vest: This piece of equipment allows you to carry the essentials like water, snacks, first aid, and extra clothes in a compact way. It removes all the issues that running with a bulky backpack would bring like changing your centre of gravity significantly. By carrying your water in the vest pouches in front of your body, and smartly packing your remaining gear all around your body, while keeping it tight to the body, your body movement should not be affected by the additional weight you’re adding to it. Our guides like to use some of these vests.

Clothes: A critical aspect of efficient and safe travel in the mountains is how you are dressed. To avoid overheating or getting too cold, make sure to wear/pack the following items:

  • Shorts: We recommend lightweight shorts that feature pockets for extra carrying capacity. Shorts with a built-in liner are ideal to mitigate any unwanted friction between the legs. Check out these guide-favourites.
  • T-shirts/long-sleeves: No cotton, and pack an extra. Depending on the season, pick something with the appropriate thickness. For cool days and as a second/downhill layer, we like Patagonia’s capilene line, and for hot days we like Salomon’s lightweight T’s.
  • Socks: Basically you want to avoid 100% cotton for many reasons. For an extensive look at the science behind buying the right running socks, see this Mizuno article. Bring an extra pair in case they get wet.
  • Base-layer bottoms: These are great to have on early colder mornings and in case the group has to stop for a longer period of time on a cooler day.
  • Rain Jacket: Unless the weather forecast predicts sun through to the day after your adventure, you’ll want to bring a rain jacket. It should be very lightweight and packable. If there is heavy rain in the forecast, we won’t be running anyway, but since rain jackets double as wind-breakers they’re great to have along with you. Wear it over your running vest.
  • Warm Jacket: Bringing a jacket like Patagonia’s Micro-Puff or similar can be a life saver, should you get cold for any reason on the trip. Anything that can be packed compactly and is warm will do!
  • Neck Gaiter & Gloves: Keeping your neck and hands warm on cold mornings or windy ridges can increase your comfort level significantly. These items can also provide some great sun protection. Light and thin is ideal on hot summer days!
  • Hat & Sunglasses: A light hat keeps the sun out of your eyes and off your head. Worrying about a sunburn or getting a headache is not something you want to be thinking about while in trail running paradise.
  • Some runners like to use sleeves and leg-warmers too

Sun cream/Anti-chafe cream: The last thing you want is skin irritation of any sort. Trust us.

First Aid: While the guide will always have a first aid kit and bivy bag for the group, it is important to pack some basic items like blister and regular band-aids, a triangular bandage, a safety “space” blanket, surgical gloves, and basic pain meds just in case. If you have any specific medication please let us know ahead of time as we will make sure to check whether or not you have it before we head out on the trail.

Headlamp: While none of our tours plan on taking place in the dark, carrying a headlamp on all your adventures is a great habit to develop; you never know! This is our favourite emergency headlamp. This piece of equipment is a life saver when darkness surprises you. 

ID/Cash/Bank Card: In case of an emergency, you’ll need to bring ID. As far as cash goes, there is nothing more disappointing than to arrive at a quaint mountain hut serving homemade apple strudel and cold drinks without any cash, so bring a bit just in case! You’d be surprised at some of the unique places they have vending machines with cold drinks in Austria. 

Hiking Equipment

Mountain Rescue Insurance: It is highly recommended to purchase mountain rescue insurance before your trip. In case of an emergency, Search and Rescue will come to your aid whether you are insured or not, but having it can save you significant sums of money in rescue fees. Alongside many other benefits like reduced prices at Austrian mountain huts, 62€/year for peace of mind in the mountains is a small price to pay. For more information visit the Austrian Alpine Club website.

Water: It is mandatory to have a carrying capacity of 1L of water on every trip. While Austria is full of fresh streams from glacial runoff and groundwater, we like to stay on the safe side and carry our drinking water. Don’t worry, we’ll be using that clean, refreshing water to cool down every chance we get!

Snacks: Snacks can make a day in the mountains that much better: M&M’s, gummies, nuts, fruit, etc. When you’re in need of a little boost, your favourite snack can give you energy and lift your spirits as well. Try to picture what you’re going to want to eat when your body is saying stop, and pack it in your pockets or backpack. No steaks please!

Lunch: Some people go all day without eating anything but trail mix, but others need something more filling. To stay on the safe side and to avoid any rapid energy loss situations, we ask that you pack a lunch on day trips. Most Austrian bakeries have delicious sandwiches that make for a great mid-day booster.

Phone: Saving the local emergency numbers as well as Trail Run Austria’s office number can save valuable time in case of an emergency. Your phone should be fully charged and we recommend bringing a plastic bag for any electronics you bring in case of rain.

Boots/Shoes: Boots/Shoes are a hiker’s most important piece of technical equipment. The Alps feature a large variety of terrain, so having boots/shoes that are up to the task of keeping you safe, comfy, and surefooted in the mountains is very important. For a great guide to finding the right hiking boot/shoe for you, check out this article by REI. Make sure to have ample foot support/protection, and most importantly, a good tread!

Poles: Hiking with some type of poles is an age-old practice and is efficient useful during long days in the mountains. Using poles reduces strain on the body, especially the knees and back, helps with balance, and saves a lot of energy while both climbing uphill and hiking downhill.

Backpack with rain cover: A 20 – 30 litre backpack is plenty on a day trip. For our multi-day trips you will likely need a 30-40 litre backpack. Make sure you have a comfortable hip strap and good back protection. Some bags come with a rain cover, but sometimes rain covers must be purchased separately.

Clothes: A critical aspect of efficient and safe travel in the mountains is how you are dressed. To avoid overheating or getting too cold, make sure to wear/pack the following items:

  • Pants/Shorts: We recommend lightweight pants/shorts that feature pockets for extra carrying capacity. Rain pants are also a good idea if you are spending a few days in the mountains.
  • T-shirts/long-sleeves: No cotton, and pack an extra. Depending on the season, pick something with the appropriate thickness. For cool days and as a second layer, we like Patagonia’s capilene line, and for hot days we like Salomon’s lightweight T’s.
  • Socks: Basically you want to avoid 100% cotton for many reasons. Bring an extra pair in case they get wet. More on hiking socks here.
  • Base-layer bottoms: These are great to have on early colder mornings and in case the group has to stop for a longer period of time on a cooler day.
  • Rain Jacket: Unless the weather forecast predicts sun through to the day after your adventure, you’ll want to bring a rain jacket. It should be very lightweight and packable. If there is heavy rain in the forecast, we won’t be hiking anyway, but since rain jackets double as wind-breakers they’re great to have along with you.
  • Warm Jacket: Bringing a jacket like Patagonia’s Micro-Puff or similar can be a life saver, should you get cold for any reason on the trip. Anything that can be packed compactly and is warm will do!
  • Neck Gaiter & Gloves: Keeping your neck and hands warm on cold mornings or windy ridges can increase your comfort level significantly. These items can also provide some great sun protection. Light and thin is ideal on hot summer days!
  • Hat & Sunglasses: A light hat keeps the sun out of your eyes and off your head. Worrying about a sunburn or getting a headache is not something you want to be thinking about while in hiking heaven.

Sun cream/Anti-chafe cream: The last thing you want is skin irritation of any sort. Trust us.

First Aid: While the guide will always have a first aid kit and bivy bag for the group, it is important to pack some basic items like blister and regular band-aids, a triangular bandage, a safety “space” blanket, surgical gloves, and basic pain meds just in case. If you have any specific medication please let us know ahead of time as we will make sure to check whether or not you have it before we head out on the trail.

Headlamp: While none of our tours plan on taking place in the dark, carrying a headlamp on all your adventures is a great habit to develop; you never know! This is our favourite emergency headlamp. This piece of equipment is a life saver when darkness surprises you. 

ID/Cash/Bank Card: In case of an emergency, you’ll need to bring ID. As far as cash goes, there is nothing more disappointing than to arrive at a quaint mountain hut serving homemade apple strudel and cold drinks without any cash, so bring a bit just in case! You’d be surprised at some of the unique places they have vending machines with cold drinks in Austria. 

BOOKING

Call for more info:

Austria: +43 677 6344 7338

Please email:

[email protected]

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